Archive by Author | Bill Bahng Boyer

Sound at AMS/SEM/SMT 2012

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This week brings us #musicon12, the megaconference of the American Musicological Society (AMS), the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM), and the Society for Music Theory (SMT). This will be the third joint conference of these societies, after Oakland in 1990 and Toronto in 2000. These roughly decennial gatherings of the three principal scholarly societies of music scholarship provide increased opportunities for cross-disciplinary conversations and amazing live performances. A fact augmented even more by the selection of New Orleans, a city known for its music, for this year’s meeting.

The conference takes place in the Sheraton and Astor Crowne Plaza hotels from this Wednesday, October 31st through Sunday, November 4th. It will be preceded by two events. The first, occurring Monday, October 29th and Tuesday, October 30th, at Tulane University’s Rogers Memorial Chapel, is Ecomusicologies2012, a pre-conference organized by the AMS Ecocriticism Study Group and the SEM Ecomusicology Special Interest Group. The second, all day Wednesday, October 31st, is the Preconference Symposium on Crisis and Creativity, held at the Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life at Tulane University.

The disciplines of musicology, ethnomusicology, and music theory have focused on sound for centuries. They are the disciplines that Michael Bull argues Sound Studies “goes beyond” in the upcoming anthology Sound Studies. While such a description could lead to the categorization of these disciplines as theoretically or methodologically antiquated, #musicon12 is too large and significant for Sound Studies to ignore, with over 600 individual presentations that all deal with sound or music somehow. The first eleven papers, in chronological order, should give some idea of the overall scope:

Dorcinda Knauth (State University of New York, Dutchess), “Composing the Future by Listening to the Musical Past: Islamic Exegesis in Javanese Folksongs”
Ruth Davis (University of Cambridge), “The Pilgrimage to ‘El-Ghriba’ and the Musical Aesthetics of a Muslim-Jewish Past”
Abigail Wood (University of Haifa, Israel), “Sound, Aesthetics, and the Narration of Religious Space in Jerusalem’s Old City”
Jonathan Dueck (Duke University), “Musical Lives and Aesthetics in the Worship Wars”
Kim Carter Muñoz (University of Washington), “‘¡Todos somos huastecos! ‘We are all Huastecan!’: Performance of the Democratization of Son Huasteco at El Festival de la huasteca (The Festival of the Huasteca)”
Raquel Paraíso (University of Wisconsin-Madison), “Festival Son Raíz: Building Community and Signifying Identity and Culture Ownership across Mexican Regions”
Ian Middleton (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), “Identity, Peace, and Learning at Rural Music Festivals in Colombia’s Caribbean Coast”
Brenda M. Romero (University of Colorado, Boulder), “‘El Carnaval de Río Sucio No Es Festival’ / ‘The Carnival of Río Sucio is Not a Festival’”
Michael O’Toole (University of Chicago), “Rehearsing Publics in a ‘Turkish Art Music’ Ensemble in Berlin”
Suzanne Wint (University of Chicago), “Rehearsing the Social: Becoming a Performer in Kampala’s Classical Music Scene”
Gregory Weinstein (University of Chicago), “Recording Rehearsing: The Hidden ‘Process of the Classical Studio Session’”

But for the sake of argument, if Sound Studies is something more than simply the application of long-standing disciplinary approaches to sonic works and events, if, as Jonathan Sterne proposed this year in his introduction to The Sound Studies Reader, “the difference between sound studies and… other fields is that they don’t require engagement with alternative epistemologies, methods, or approaches” (4), then we are inclined to pay attention to that work that reaches beyond the limits of conventional music scholarship, namely the sort which strives for some sort of critical self-reflection or interdisciplinary ambition.

Lost Bayou Ramblers. Borrowed from phillipleroyer on Flickr.

This is not an easy task given the vast number of papers and performances at such a large conference and the scarcity of information found in brief titles and abstracts. We can assume that every presentation challenges these conventions to some extent, but for the sake of this preview, here are a few items that venture beyond the traditional limits of music scholarship. You can find the full #musicon12 program here.

Featured Image: Mardi Gras 2005, By Robert Garcia, The City Project

Bill Bahng Boyer is an adjunct professor of music, writing and rhetoric at Dartmouth College. He is also a doctoral candidate in music at New York University, completing a dissertation on public listening in the New York City subway system.

Jump to MONDAY, October 29
Jump to TUESDAY, October 30
Jump to WEDNESDAY, October 31
Jump to THURSDAY, November 1
Jump to FRIDAY, November 2
Jump to SATURDAY, November 3
Jump to SUNDAY, November 4

New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 2005, Borrowed From Robert Garcia, The City Project

MONDAY, October 29

Ecomusicologies2012

All events at Rogers Memorial Chapel, Tulane University

5-6pm Soundwalk

Tyler Kinnear (University of British Columbia), “Environmental Listening and the Tulane Soundscape” (meeting place outside the entrance of the Rogers Memorial Chapel, Tulane University)

7-9pm Paper Jam

Chair: Aaron S. Allen (University of North Carolina, Greensboro)

Joe Browning (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London) (virtual presentation), “Crane Calls and Shakuhachi Sounds: Interconnections, Disjunctures and New Directions in the Tsuru no Sugomori Pieces”

Travis Stimeling (Millikin University) (virtual presentation), “Music, Television Advertising, and the Green Positioning of the Global Energy Industry in the United States”

Olga Sánchez-Kisielewska (Northwestern University) (virtual presentation), “Theorizing the Musical Landscapes of John Luther Adams”

Andrew Mark (York University) (virtual presentation), “Consciousness, Solidarity, and Musicking: Ecoethnographic Justice”

Leah G. Weinberg (University of Michigan), “Orchestrating Nature: Music, Manipulation, and 1950s America in Disney’s True- Life Adventure Films”

Settimio Fiorenzo Palermo (Middlesex University), “Sounds Heard: the Environmental Ethics & Aesthetics of Hugh Davies’s Music”

Sabine Feisst (Arizona State University), “Negotiating Nature & Music Through Technology: Ecological Reflections in the Works of Maggi Payne & Laurie Spiegel”

The Canal Street Line. Borrowed from Hmeriomx on Flickr.

TUESDAY, October 30

Ecomusicologies2012 (cont.)

All events at Rogers Memorial Chapel, Tulane University

8:30-10:30am Panel: Beyond Metaphor

Mark Pedelty (University of Minnesota), Chair

Marc Perlman (Brown University), “Instrument Builders As Environmental Activists: A Tale of Two Tonewoods”

Kevin Dawe (University of Leeds), “Small is Beautiful: Guitar Making, Sustainability and Community Building in Britain and Africa”

Jeff Todd Titon (Brown University), “Why Thoreau?”

Jennifer C. Post (New Zealand School of Music, Victoria University, Wellington), “Beyond Birds: (Ethno)musicologists, Environmental Scientists & the Evolution of Soundscape Ecology”

11am-1pm Panel: 20th & 21st-century Composers

Denise Von Glahn (Florida State University), Chair

Eric Drott (University of Texas at Austin), “The Peasant’s Voice and the Tourist’s Gaze:  Listening to Landscape in Luc Ferrari’sPetite symphonie intuitive pour un paysage de printemps”

You Nakai (New York University), “An Electronic Ecology:  The Natures of David Tudor’s Electronic Music”

Jacob A. Cohen (The Graduate Center, CUNY), “Carl Ruggles, Walt Whitman, and the Gendered Place of Men and Mountains”

Joseph Finkel (Arizona State University), “Searching for a Sonic Ecology:  John Luther Adams’s Dark Waves”

2-3:30pm, Panel: Contemporary Issues

Sabine Feisst (Arizona State University), Chair

Melissa J. de Graaf (University of Miami), “‘The Music of Nature Makes Me Dream and Sleep’: Intersections of Nature, Gender, and Ultramodernism”

Alexandra Hui (Mississippi State University), “Agency and Aural Rights: Negotiating the Soundscape, 1948 to the Present”

Tyler Kinnear (University of British Columbia), “Emergent Soundscapes: Uses of Nature and Technology in Two Electroacoustic Compositions”

4-6pm, Panel: Ethnographic Approaches

William Bares (University of North Carolina, Asheville), Chair

Dan Bendrups (Queensland Conservatorium Resarch Centre, Griffith University), “Mapping Outdoor Music Festival Engagement with Ecological and Environmental Issues in Australia”

Robin Ryan (Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, Edith Cowan University), “Eucalyptus as Musical Resource: Some Ecological Considerations”

Michael Silvers (University of California, Los Angeles), “Birdsong, Popular Music, &Predicting Rain in Northeastern Brazil”

Charlotte D’Evelyn (University of Hawaii), “Sounds of the Grasslands: An Ecomusicological Crisis of Romanticism, Loss, & Inheritance in Inner Mongolia, China”

6:30-8pm, Panel: Canadian Perspectives

Ellen Waterman (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Chair

Kate Galloway (Memorial University of Newfoundland), “Sounding the Environmental Past and Present: Repurposing and Representing Soundscape in Contemporary Canadian Compositions”

Erin Scheffer (University of Toronto), “The Mis-imagined Native: Musically Constructing Nativeness in 1940s Canadian Radio and Film Docudramas”

Jeremy Strachan (University of Toronto), “Sounding Empire: Coloniality and Environment in Canadian Art Music”

8-9pm, Reception & Concert

James Harley (University of Guelph), computer, and Ellen Waterman (Memorial University of Newfoundland), amplified flutes, “Birding,” an eco-improvisational performance by ~spin~

Borrowed from mattbyrne on Flickr.

WEDNESDAY, October 31

SEM Pre-conference Symposium, Crisis and Creativity

All events at Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life, Tulane University

9:00-10:30am, Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans

Matt Sakakeeny (Tulane University), Chair

Nick Spitzer, Professor of Anthropology (Tulane University), Holly Hobbs, Director of the NOLA Hip-Hop Archive (Tulane University), Bennie Pete, leader of Hot 8 Brass Band

10:45-12:15pm New Realities: Haitian Performing Arts and the Built Environment

Joyce Jackson (Louisiana State University), Chair

Gage Averill, Dean of Arts (University of British Columbia)

Michael Largey, Professor of Ethnomusicology (Michigan State University)

Jean Montes, Director of Orchestral Studies (Loyola University New Orleans)

1:15-2:45pm, Environmental Crises in South Louisiana: Scientific, Sociological, and Ethnomusicological Perspectives

Mark DeWitt (University of Louisiana at Lafayette), Chair

Tommy Michot, Research Scientist (UL Lafayette), and member of Les Frères Michot

Robert Gramling, Professor of Sociology (UL Lafayette)

Mark DeWitt, Professor of Music (UL Lafayette)

3:00-5:00pm, Field Trip by Bus to Musician’s Village, New Orleans Area Habitat for Humanity (Upper Ninth Ward), House of Dance and Feathers (Lower Ninth Ward)

Milterngerger House. Borrowed from DavidPaulOhmer on Flickr.

THURSDAY, November 1

8:30-10:30am, The Beautiful, The Good, and The Story: Aesthetics and Narrative in Religious Music

Session 1-1 (SEM) A: Astor Ballroom 1

Jonathan Dueck (Duke University), Chair

Dorcinda Knauth (State University of New York, Dutchess), “Composing the Future by Listening to the Musical Past: Islamic Exegesis in Javanese Folksongs”

Ruth Davis (University of Cambridge), “The Pilgrimage to ‘El-Ghriba’ and the Musical Aesthetics of a Muslim-Jewish Past”

Abigail Wood (University of Haifa, Israel), “Sound, Aesthetics, and the Narration of Religious Space in Jerusalem’s Old City”

Jonathan Dueck (Duke University), “Musical Lives and Aesthetics in the Worship Wars”

12:30-1:30pm, SEM Sound Studies Special Interest Group Meeting

S: Oakley

3:30-5:00pm, On Bells, Bugs, and Disintegrating Tape: Listening for Metaphysics in Ambient Sound

Session 1-44 AMS/SEM S. Edgewood

Mitchell Morris (University of California, Los Angeles), Chair

Paul Chaikin (University of Southern California), “Clattering Bells as a Field of Experience and Cognition”

James Edwards (University of California, Los Angeles), “Nature and the Metaphysics of Voice in Edo Period Aesthetics”

Joanna Demers (University of Southern California), “The Ethics of Apocalypse”

4:00-5:30pm, Musically Meaningful Soundscapes

Session 1-52 SEM S: Maurepas

Tom Porcello (Vassar College), Chair

Alison Furlong (Ohio State University), “Sound, Space, and Social Practice in the Zionskirche”

Kate Galloway (Memorial University of Newfoundland), “Sounding and Composing the Harbour: Performing Landscape and Re-contextualizing the Soundscape of Place in the Harbour Symphony (St. John’s, Newfoundland)”

Jessamyn Doan (University of Pennsylvania), “‘Bringin’ Back the Roots’: Rearticulating a Creole Sound in Southern Louisiana”

5:30–6:30pm, SEM First-Time Attendees and New Members

Reception S: Sheraton Grand B

5:30–6:30pm, AMS Ecocriticism SG* and SEM Ecomusicology SIG Joint Business Meeting

S: Oak Alley

7:30–midnight, Zydeco Dance Lesson and Evening at Rock’n’Bowl

Organized by the SEM 2012 Local Arrangements Committee and the SEM Dance, Movement, and Gesture Section

Dance Lesson at Sheraton Grand E (no ticket required), 7:30–8:30 p.m.

Evening at Rock’n’Bowl. Bus Departs Sheraton: 8:45 p.m. Bus Departs Rock’n’Bowl for Sheraton: 12:00 midnight

8:00–11:00 AMS Music and Philosophy SG Session

A: Astor Ballroom III

8:00-11:00pm, Fantasy, Cinema, Sound, and Music

Session 1-58 AMS S: Oak Alley

Mark Brill (University of Texas at San Antonio)

James Deaville (Carleton University)

J. Drew Stephen (University of Texas at San Antonio)

Jamie Lynn Webster (Portland, Ore.)

8:00-11:00pm, Music and Nature: Relations, Awareness, Knowledge

Session 1-64 AMS S: Borgne
Sponsored by the AMS Ecocriticism SG

Aaron Allen (University of North Carolina, Greensboro), Chair

Kevin Dawe (University of Leeds), “RELATIONS—A Social and Environmental History of Small Guitar Workshops in England”

Sabine Feisst (Arizona State University), “AWARENESS—‘Hello, the Earth is Speaking’: Four Case Studies of Ecological Composition, Performance, and Listening”

David E. Cohen (Columbia University), “KNOWLEDGE—Nature, Culture, and the First Principle(s) of Music: Two Myths of Theoretical Revelation”

Borrowed from prayitno on Flickr.

FRIDAY, November 2

7:00–8:00am, SEM SIG for Voice Studies

S: Estherwood

7:00–8:30am, SMT Committee on the Status of Women

S: Roux Bistro Private

9:00-noon, The Ecomusicology Listening Room

Session 2-17 AMS/SEM S: Gallier
Co-Sponsored by the SEM Sound Studies Interest Group and the AMS Popular Music Study Group

Mark Pedelty (University of Minnesota), Chair

Robert Fallon (Carnegie Mellon University), Ellen Waterman (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Tyler Kinnear (University of British Columbia), Aaron Allen (University of North Carolina, Greensboro), Denise Von Glahn (Florida State University), Kate Galloway (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Naomi Perley (CUNY), William Bares (Harvard University), Rachel Mundy (Columbia University), Jeremy Woodruff (University of Pittsburgh), Justin D. Burton (Rider University), Michael Austin (University of Texas at Dallas), Michael B. Silvers (University of California, Los Angeles), Miki Kaneda (Museum of Modern Art), Zeynep Bulut (Berlin Institute for Cultural Inquiry)

10:30-noon, Beyond Hearing: Soundscapes and Ideoscape in Early Nineteenth-Century America

Session 2-25 AMS/SEM A: Iberville
Deane Root (University of Pittsburgh), Chair

Sarah Gerk (University of Michigan), “Love, Loyalty, and Fear: American Reception of Thomas Moore’s Irish Melodies”

Bonnie Gordon (University of Virginia), “Mr. Jefferson’s Ears”

12:00–2:00pm, AMS/SMT Music and Philosophy SG/IG

S: Sheraton Grand A

12:30–1:30pm, SEM Medical Ethnomusicology SIG

A: Astor Grand A

12:30–1:30pm, SEM Section on the Status of Women

S: Bayside C

2:00-5:00pm, Embodiment and Gesture

Session 2-38 AMS/SMT S: Oak Alley

Arnie Cox (Oberlin College), Chair

Margaret Britton (University of Texas at Austin), “Four Gestural Types in Chopin’s Mazurka in C-sharp Minor, Op. 50, no. 3”

Drew Massey (Binghamton University), “Thomas Adès’s Glossary”

Meghan Goodchild (CIRMMT / McGill University), “Towards a PerceptuallyBased Theory of Orchestral Gestures”

Zachary Wallmark, Marco Iacoboni (University of California, Los Angeles), “Embodied Listening and Musical Empathy: Perspectives from Mirror Neuron Research”

4:00-5:30pm, SEM Charles Seeger Lecture

Session 2-49 SEM S: Sheraton Grand C

Portia Maultsby (Indiana University), “‘Everybody Wanna Sing my Blues . . . Nobody Wanna Live My Blues’: Deconstructing Narratives of Race, Culture and Power in African American Music Scholarship”

Cheryl L. Keyes (University of California, Los Angeles), Introduction

6:00pm, Sound Studies Special Interest Group Soundwalk

Meet in front of the Sheraton Hotel on Canal Street

Matt Sakakeeny (Tulane University), organizer

8:00-11:00pm, Music and Video Games: History, Theory, Ethnography

Session 2-55 AMS S: Gallier

William Cheng (Harvard University), Moderator

Mark Katz (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), Respondent

Neil Lerner (Davidson College), “Musicological Contributions to Early Video Game Studies”

Roger Moseley (Cornell University), “Digital Analogies”

William Gibbons (Texas Christian University), “Framing Devices for Gaming Devices: Applying Film Music Theory to Video Games”

Elizabeth Medina-Gray (Yale University), “Modularity and Dynamic Play: Video Game Music and Its Avant-garde Antecedents”

Kiri Miller (Brown University), “Dance Central and the Listening Body”

Borrowed from squared2x on Flickr.

SATURDAY, November 3

7:00–8:30am, SMT Music and Disability IG

S: Salon 828

7:00–8:45am, AMS Committee on Women and Gender

S: Salon 825

8:30-10:30am, Emergent Forms of Music Tourism, I: Music Tourism in the Aftermath of Rupture in New Orleans, Berlin, Bali

Session 3-2 SEM S: Bayside B
Daniel Sharp (Tulane University), Chair

Elizabeth Macy (University of California, Los Angeles), “Music and Cultural Tourism in Post-Disaster Economies”

Luis-Manuel Garcia (Tulane University), “Consuming Atmospheres and Social Worlds: ‘Techno-Tourismus’ and Post-Tourist Tourism in Berlin’s Electronic Dance Music Scenes”

Daniel Sharp (Tulane University), “Dithyrambalina: A Shantytown Sound Installation in Post-Katrina New Orleans”

SherriLynn Colby-Bottel (University of Virginia), “Authenticity Seekers: Music Post-Tourists and the Shifting Sound-Scapes of New Orleans”

8:30-10:30am, Online Musical Communities

Session 3-7 AMS/SEM A: Astor Ballroom 1
Marc Gidal (Ramapo College of New Jersey), Chair

Tara Browner (University of California, Los Angeles), “Bach Culture: Performers, Scholars, and Bachfreunde in the Twenty-First Century”

Olga Panteleeva (University of California, Berkeley), “Für Kenner und Liebhaber 2.0: Modes of Expertise in Online File-Sharing Communities”

Tom Artiss (University of Cambridge), “Solitary Socialities: Music Surf-Sharing in Nain, Labrador”

Charles Hiroshi Garrett (University of Michigan), “Joking Matters: Music, Humor, and the Digital Revolution”

9:00-10:30am, Language and the Senses

Session 3-10 AMS/SMT S: Edgewood
Donald Boomgaarden (Loyola University New Orleans), Chair

Charles Dill (University of Wisconsin-Madison), “Le Cerf’s Epistemology of Music”

Amy M. Cimini (University of Pennsylvania), “René Descartes’ Unfinished Compendium of Music: Rethinking Music and the Politics of Sensation after the Thirty Years’ War

9:00-10:30am, Music and Gaming

Session 3-12 AMS A: Iberville
Kiri Miller (Brown University), Chair

Christopher Tonelli (Memorial University of Newfoundland), “The Chiptuning of the World”

Neil Lerner (Davidson College), “Investigating the Origins of Video Game Music Style, 1977–1983: The Early Cinema Hypothesis”

9:00-noon, Performing Music, Performing Disability

Session 3-19 AMS/SEM/SMT S: Bayside A
Joseph Straus (Graduate Center, CUNY), Chair

Michael Bakan (Florida State University), Michael Beckerman (New York University), Stefan Honisch (University of British Columbia), Blake Howe (Louisiana State University), Stephanie Jensen-Moulton (Brooklyn College, CUNY), Bruce Quaglia (University of Utah)

9:00-noon, Sound, Language, and Mysticism from Vienna to L.A.

Session 3-22 AMS S:Borgne
Brian Kane (Yale University), Chair

Clara Latham (New York University), “The Impact of Sound and Voice on the Invention of Psychoanalysis”

Sherry Lee (University of Toronto), “‘Still, o schweige’: Music, Language, OpernKrise (Schoenberg’s Die glückliche Hand )”

Nicholas Attfield (Edinburgh University), “A Medieval Model for the 1920s: Anton Bruckner as Mystic”

J. Daniel Jenkins (University of South Carolina), “I Care If You Listen: Schoenberg’s ‘School of Criticism’ and the Role of the Amateur”

10:30-noon, Twentieth-Century Music and Advertising

Session 3-28 AMS A: Iberville

Jason Hanley (Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum), Chair

Paul Christiansen (University of Southern Maine), “‘It’s Morning Again in America’: How the Tuesday Team Revolutionized the Use of Music in Political Ads”

Jonathan Waxman (New York University), “I Went to the New York Philharmonic and Came Home with a Cadillac: The Alliance Between Business and the Arts in the Early Twentieth Century

12:00–2:00pm, SMT Committee on the Status of Women Brown Bag Open Lunch

S: Salon 828

12:30–1:30pm SEM Gender and Sexualities Taskforce

S: Bayside C

1:45-3:45pm, Acoustics and Experiences of the Limit

Session 3-39 SEM S: Maurepas

Louise Meintjes (Duke University), Chair

Louise Meintjes (Duke University), “Pushing at the Edge of the Social”

Jairo Moreno (University of Pennsylvania), “Signatures of the Audible”

Ana Maria Ochoa (Columbia University), “South American Acoustics: Amerindian Perspectivism and Non-Linear Musical Histories”

Gary Tomlinson (Yale University), “Singing at the Limit of the Human”

1:45-3:45pm, Emergent Forms of Music Tourism, II: Multimedia, Spectacles and Memorials

Session 3-43 SEM S: Grand Chenier
Sponsored by the Popular Music Section (PMSSEM)

Lynda Paul (Yale University), Chair

Elizabeth Whittenburg Ozment (University of Georgia), “Elvis Presley and the Reanimation of Robert E. Lee”

Lynda Paul (Yale University), “Las Vegas and Virtual Tourism: Sonic Shaping of Simulated Worlds”

Michael Heller (Harvard University), “Deployments of Deadness at the Louis Armstrong House Museum”

Nicol Hammond (New York University), “‘The History Is in the Music’? Music, Museums, and the Politics of Presence in Post-Apartheid Cultural Tourism”

8:00-11:00pm, Music and Disability: Works in Progress Seminar

AMS/SMT S: Bayside A
Sponsored by the AMS Disability SG and SMT Disability IG

Michael Bakan (Florida State University), James Deaville (Carleton University), Stefan Honisch (University of British Columbia), Jeanette Jones (Boston University), Anabel Maler (University of Chicago), Julie Saiki (Stanford University), Joseph Straus (Graduate Center, CUNY)

9:00pm, KNOCKABOUT: wandering beats from across urban America.

Handsome Willy’s at 218 South Robertson St. No cover. 21+

5 DJs converge on Handsome Willy’s for KNOCKABOUT, a dance party featuring every genre you’ve ever loved and fly beats that you neva eva heard before.

DJ Yamin (NOLA): Hip-hop, funk, reggae, Afrobeat www.nolamix.com

DJ Super Squirrel (Boston): Dancehall, global mashup www.djsupersquirrel.com

The Attic Bat (L.A.): Hip-hop and dubstep www.derricomusic.com

LMGM (Chicago, Berlin): House and disco www.thelusisgarcia.com

Shilo Bourne (L.A.) UK bass

Roger Lewis. Borrowed from fantailmedia at Fiickr.

SUNDAY, November 4

8:30-10:30am, Music and YouTube: Sound, Media, and Sociality

Session 4-5 SEM A: Astor Grand A
Sponsored by the Popular Music Section (PMSSEM)

Monique M. Ingalls (University of Cambridge), Chair

Fabian Holt (Roskilde University, Denmark), “Social Media Video and the Festivalization of Electronic Dance Music in Europe”

Monique M. Ingalls (University of Cambridge), “Worship on the Web: Building Online Religious Community through Christian Devotional Music Videos”

Patricia G. Lange (California College of the Arts), “In Synch with Lip-Synching: A Riff on Teen Sociality”

Trevor S. Harvey (University of Iowa), “Dulcimerica: Mediating a Musical Community through Video Podcasts”

8:30-10:30am, Musical Propertization in the Digital Age:

Session 4-7 SEM A: Astor Ballroom 1
From “Piracy” to Ontological Politics
Andrew Eisenberg (University of Oxford), Chair

Andrew Eisenberg (University of Oxford), “M-Commerce and the (Re)making of the Music Industry in Kenya”

Aditi Deo (University of Oxford), “Folk Music in the Digital Realm: Public Commons or Cultural Property?”

Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier (University of Victoria), “Pirates of the Caribbean: Music Circulation in Late Socialist Cuba”

Henry Stobart (Royal Holloway, University of London), “Shifting Properties: Ownership, Informality, and the Digital Music Video in Bolivia”

9:00-noon, The City is a Medium

Session 4-16 AMS/SEM/SMT S: Edgewood
Alexander Rehding (Harvard University), Chair

Veit Erlmann (University of Texas at Austin), Respondent

Benjamin Tausig (New York University), “The City is Burning: Informal Musical Commerce at Urban Protest Movements”

Tiffany Ng (University of California, Berkeley), “An Instrument of Urban Planning: Bells and the Sonic Remediation of Community Space in the Southeastern United States”

John Melillo (University of Arizona), “Phatic Emphatic: Listening to New York City in Downtown Poetry and Punk”

Peter McMurray (Harvard University), “Heterophony of a Metropolis: Rites of Passage and Contestation Turkish Berlin”

10:45-12:15pm, Feminist Approaches to Music and Sound Technologies: History, Theory, and Practice

Session 4-29 SEM A: Astor Ballroom 1
Sponsored by the Section on the Status of Women (SSW)
Tara Rodgers (University of Maryland), Chair

Tara Rodgers (University of Maryland), “Feminist Approaches to Electronic Music and Sound Historiography”

Charity Marsh (University of Regina), “Reluctant Hip Hop Warriors”: Feminist Approaches to Hop Hop Community Projects”

10:45-12:15pm, Intersections of Ethnomusicology with Other Fields

Session 4-31 SEM S: Bayside B

Theresa Allison (University of California, San Francisco), Chair

Francesca R. Sborgi Lawson (Brigham Young University), “Has Ethnomusicology Met Its Calling? An Ethnomusicologist’s Response to Biomusicology”

Monique McGrath (University of Toronto), “What Does Ethnomusicology Have to Say to Music Therapy?”

Jeremy Day-O’Connell (Knox College), “‘Motherese’ and Universals of Musical Pitch

10:45-12:15pm, Sounds and Space in New Orleans

Session 4-35 SEM S: Maurepas
Marié Abe (Boston University), Chair

Danielle Adomaitis (Florida State University), “Sonic Fixtures and Drifting Buskers: Soundmarks of New Orleans and the Street Musicians Who Construct Them”

Zarah Ersoff (University of California, Los Angeles), “Treme’s Aural Verisimilitude”

Julie Raimondi (Tufts University), “Music, SEO Agency, and the Social Construction of Space in New Orleans

2:00–6:00pm, AMS Ecocriticism SG and SEM Ecomusicology SIG Outing:

Barataria Preserve Hike

Sound at SEM/CORD 2011

Sound Studies has been celebrated, as Kara Keeling and Josh Kun recently pointed out in American Quarterly, as both the result of and inspiration for an increasing number of scholars, who “not only take the culture, consumption, and politics of sound seriously but are making it the centerpiece of their research, publishing, and pedagogy.”  But what significance does Sound Studies hold for ethnomusicology, a discipline that for over half a century has focused directly on the social and political dimensions of what John Blacking famously called “humanly organized sound”? This question will be one of many circulating in Philadelphia this week at the 56th annual meeting of the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM).

The Heart of Baltimore Avenue, West Wall

The Heart of Baltimore Avenue, a mural with accompanying sound broadcast at 91.3 FM.

Despite the centrality of ethnographers of music, including Steven Feld and Veit Erlmann, to the emergence of this new interdisciplinary body of knowledge, many ethnomusicologists saw room for greater dialogue with other disciplines for whom the sonic was a relatively novel epistemological filter. To this end, in early 2009 a group of young SEM members formed the Sound Studies Special Interest Group (SSSIG) in order to foster cross-disciplinary discussions and highlight work within SEM that reimagined sound beyond “the music itself.” This year’s conference will mark the end of my tenure as co-chair of the Sound Studies SIG, and elections will be held for a replacement at our annual lunch meeting on Thursday, November 17th. If you are interested in joining the group and can attend the conference, please join us. If you can’t make it to Philadelphia, you can still join the group’s active discussion forum.

The past few years have witnessed an increasing number of presentations at SEM that fall under the umbrella of Sound Studies, a trend acknowledged in the theme of last fall’s meeting in Los Angeles, “Sound Ecologies.” This year is no different, and from a preliminary glance at the program, I have taken the liberty of highlighting a few acoustic currents running throughout the conference. A large number of panels this year are devoted to issues of embodiment, which can, for the most part, be attributed to the fact that SEM has paired up with the Congress on Research in Dance (CORD) for a joint conference. In the summary below I have noted which group is sponsoring each panel listed, although the conference requires only one registration and all panels are open to all participants and attendees.

Pandemonium, at the Eastern State Penitentiary

Pandemonium, a 2005 sound installation at the Eastern State Penitentiary

The theme of this year’s joint conference is “Moving Music / Sounding Dance: Intersections, Disconnections, and Alignments between Dance and Music.” Many of this year’s panels focus on the relationship between sound and bodies, including embodied practices in music and dance and bodily communications of carnality, empathy and affect, and music and movement, for example. The voice is also prominent this year, in panels on its relationship to the body and music, dance performance in the Pacific Islands, pedagogy and practice, and female Iranian vocalists in exile. As in other years, the relationship between ethnomusicology and medicine is also represented, as are music’s connection to healing and the sporting body.

Technology, another area of interest for Sound Studies, will receive thorough attention this year. Panels on techno-mediated performance, sound and technology, online gamespaces and prosthetic technologies of queer expression, and material culture and labor.

Looking beyond sound toward intersensoriality, many panels discuss the relationship between the aural and other senses, in terms of music visualization, sound, sight and time, ethnographic film, and sensing movement and sound in dance.

The Painted Bride Art Center
The Painted Bride Art Center

Two events that promise to be of special interest will focus on language, one a roundtable on keywords in music and motion, the other a panel on the lexicon of music, noise, sound, and silence.

A number of panels hearken back to early work on soundscapes, from discussions of field recordings and ethnography and gender and negotiating space, to the sounds of post-industrial society, protest and public spaces, and boomboxes and dance parties. My last official duty as SSSIG co-chair will be to lead a soundwalk through Philadelphia’s city center. This soundwalk is an event that the SSSIG would love to see annually as a way to connect meetings to their immediate environs.

All in all, this year’s joint conference promises to be an enjoyable one, with plenty of fascinating presentations and more good music than you can shake a tailfeather at. Even if you can’t attend, you can follow along virtually on twitter. Both #SEM2011 and #2011SEM seem to be in use.

Bill Bahng Boyer is co-chair of the Society for Ethnomusicology Sound Studies Special Interest Group and a lecturer in music, writing and rhetoric at Dartmouth College. He is also a doctoral candidate in music at New York University, completing a dissertation on public listening in the New York City subway system.

The Sound of Philadelphia, by MFSB

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THURSDAY, November 17, 2011

THURSDAY PANELS

8:30 am -10:30 am

Sounding Religion in the Public Sphere

SEM: 1E Freedom Ballroom (Section F) Chair: Monique M Ingalls, Rutgers University

Monique M Ingalls, Rutgers University. Worship in the Streets: Performing Religion, Nation, and Ethnicity through Music in Toronto’s Jesus in the City Parade

Carolyn Landau, King’s College London. Pluralism, Tolerance and Engagement with the “Mainstream”: Navigating Ismaili-Muslim Identities in Public Musical Performances

David M Kammerer, Brigham Young University-Hawaii. Anything But a “Silent Night”: Tonga’s Royal Maopa Brass Band and the Tradition of Christmas Eve Serenading

Deborah Justice, Indiana University. When Sacred Space becomes Secular Space: How a Church’s Saturday Dinner Show for Charity Eases Sunday Morning Tensions

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Recovering and Composing Hybridity through Histories of Music and Violence

SEM: 1I Salon 5/6 Chair: Jessica A Schwartz, New York University

Jessica A Schwartz, New York University. Between Continuity and Disruption: Strategic Hybridity in the Musical Activism of Rongelapese Women

T. Christopher Aplin, independent scholar. Martial Cosmopolitans: Apache War and Song Beyond Borders during the “Loco Outbreak”

Kristy Riggs, Columbia University. Musical Fabulation and the Retelling of Violence in 1840s Algeria

Sarah McClimon, University of Hawaii at Manoa. War Memories Revisited: Hybrid Nationalism and Discourses of Cultural Purity in Japanese Military Song Festivals

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Dancing Matter(s): Embodied Practices in Music and Dance

SEM: 2A Freedom Ballroom (Section E), Live Video-Streaming Room Chair: Tomie Hahn, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Tomie Hahn, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dancing with Sensible Objects

Sean Williams, Evergreen State College. Dancing with the Drum: Teaching and Learning Sundanese Jaipongan

Sally Ann Ness, University of California, Riverside. Dancing Instruments; Objectivity in Musical Performance

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Vocal Epistemologies: Bodies, Pedagogy, Practice

SEM: 2H Salon 3/4 Chair: Robert O Beahrs, University of California, Berkeley

Robert O Beahrs, University of California, Berkeley. Echoing through the Nine Skies: Embodied Knowledge Production in Tuvan Throat-Singing Pedagogy

Marti Newland, Columbia University. Cocolo Japanese Gospel Choir: Mediating Spiritual and Racial Difference through Vocal Adduction

Sumitra Ranganathan, University of California, Berkeley. Dwelling in my Throat: Sound and Experience in a North Indian Classical Dhrupad Tradition

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Local Philadelphia Communities

CORD: Independence Ballroom D

Laura Vriend. Sufjan Stevens and the Magic Snowflake: Sound and Spatiality in Headlong Dance Theater’s Explanatorium

Christine Dang. My Laudations Shorten for me the Journey to the Saints’: The Poetics of Exile in an Islamic Community of Philadelphia

Abimbola N. Cole. Welcome to the United Stated of Africa: Kwame Nkrumah’s Philadelphia Years, African Nationalism, and Hip-Hop Perspectives on Unity in the New Africa

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Sacred Journeys, Spaces, Sounds

CORD: Logans 1

Andrea Mantell Seidel. Sacred Sound: Tuning the Cosmic Strings of the Subtle Dancing Body

Emily Wright. Sacred Spaces: History and Practice in Christian Sacred Dance

Lizzie Leopold. Voyager, A Journey into Our Outer Spaces: A Choreographic and Scholarly Exploration

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1:45-3:45pm

Techno-Mediated Performance: Virtual, Visceral, Spectacular

SEM: 3E Freedom Ballroom (Section F) Chair: Kiri Miller, Brown University

Kiri Miller, Brown University. Virtual Transmission, Visceral Practice: Dance Central and the Cybershala

J. Meryl Krieger, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. From Live Performance to Mashup: Mediated Performance in Popular Music

Judith Hamera, Texas A&M University. Dances with Zombies: Michael Jackson and Movement in the Age of Post-Industrial Reproduction

Sydney Hutchinson, Syracuse University. Downloading Dance: OK Go, YouTube, and the Future of Pop

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Gendered Intimacies and Musical Negotiations of Space

SEM: 3F Freedom Ballroom (Section G) Chair: Ian R MacMillen, University of Pennsylvania

Anna Stirr, St. John’s College, University of Oxford. Sensuality, Exchange, and Violence in Nepali Nightclubs

Gavin Steingo, Columbia University. On the Sonic Politics of Spinning

Ian R MacMillen, University of Pennsylvania. Conscription into Intimacy: Young Men, Power, and the Gendered Inclusion of Croatian Tambura Musicians

Jane Sugarman, CUNY Graduate Center, Discussant

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Round Table – Sound and Sense in the Muslim World: The Politics of Listening

SEM: 3J Parlor A Chair: Deborah Kapchan, New York University

Jonathan Glasser, College of William and Mary

Rich Jankowsky, Tufts University

Galeet Dardashti, independent scholar

Deborah Kapchan, New York University

Michael Frishkopf, University of Alberta

THURSDAY INDIVIDUAL PAPERS

Noel Lobley, University of Oxford, Pitt Rivers Museum. Recording, Remembering and Using the Sounds of Africa

2:15 SEM: 3H Salon 3/4

Gregory Weinstein, University of Chicago. An “Acoustically Perfect Hall”?: Engineering Space in Classical Recordings

3:15 SEM: 3H Salon 3/4

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Philadelphia Record Exchange

Philadelphia Record Exchange

EVENTS

SEM Sound Studies Special Interest Group Meeting

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm Salon 5/6

SEM Audio Visual Committee

12:30 pm – 1:30 pmFreedom Ballroom (Section G)

SEM Student Open Meeting, Sponsored by the Student Concerns Committee

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm Independence Ballroom (Section A)

SEM SSSIG Philadelphia Soundwalk

Led by Bill Bahng Boyer, SSSIG co-chair

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm 4K Hotel Lobby

SEM/CORD Joint First-Time Attendees and New Members Reception

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm Horizons Rooftop Ballroom

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Philadelphia native Fresh Prince

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FRIDAY, November 18, 2011

FRIDAY PANELS

8:30 pm -10:30 pm

Round Table— Keywords of Music and Motion

SEM: 5D Independence Ballroom (Section C) Chair: Christina Zanfagna, Santa Clara University

Christina Zanfagna, Santa Clara University

Jason Stanyek, New York University

Melvin Butler, University of Chicago

Tamara Roberts, University of California, Berkeley

Martin Daughtry, New York University

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Intimately Political: Bodily Communications of Carnality, Empathy and Affect in Dance Practices and Criticism.

CORD: Freedom Ballroom H

Evandne Kelly. Embodied Affects of Nationalism and Ethnicity in the Dances of Fijian Diasporas in Canada

Emma Doran. Dancing in Your Seat: Reading Empathy in Print Media

Shawn Newman. It’s all in the hips: Sexual and Artistic Minority in Canadian Concert Jazz Dance

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10:45am-12:15pm

Rethinking Music Visualization

CORD: Independence Ballroom D

Paul Scolieri. Ruth St. Denis, Walter Benjamin, and the Mimetic Faculty

Daniel Callahan. Absolutely Unmanly: The Music Visualizations of Ted Shawn and His Men Dancers

Stephanie Jordan. Troubling Visualisations: Mark Morris Marks the Music

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1:45-3:45pm

Sounds of Difference and Recognition: Music, Interculturalism, and Belonging in the European Nation-State

SEM: 7C Independence Ballroom (Section B) Chair: Benjamin Teitelbaum, Brown University

Joshua Tucker, Brown University. New Latinos in the Old World: Music, Multiculturalism, and Ethnogenesis in a Changing Spain

Benjamin Teitelbaum, Brown University. Unity Intoned: Music and the Rhetorical Paradoxes of Swedish Radical Nationalism

Adriana Helbig, University of Pittsburgh. The Influence of Paul Robeson?s Musical Legacy on Soviet and Post-Soviet Racial Ideologies

Timothy Rice, University of California, Los Angeles. Discussant

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Sound, Technology

SEM: 7I Salon 5/6 Chair: Leslie Gay, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Trevor S Harvey, Florida State University. Live from Second Life: Social Actualization through Musical Participation in Virtual Worlds

Alan Williams, University of Massachusetts, Lowell. All Hands On Deck: Choreographed Intimacy in the Analog Mixing Process

Tim Miller, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Instruments as Technology: Co-constructing the Pedal Steel Guitar

Lauren Flood, Columbia University. Arduino Revolution: Hacking the Way to New Sounds and Moveable Art with Open Source Technology

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Music and the Body/Voice

SEM: 7J Parlor A Chair: Elizabeth Tolbert, Peabody Conservatory, Johns Hopkins University

Max M Schmeder, Columbia University. At One With One’s Instrument: Transcending the Body-Instrument Divide

Katherine L Meizel, Bowling Green State University. Hearing Voices: Toward a Model for the Study of Vocality

Peter Williams, University of Kansas. Docile Bodies Improvising: Gender and Constraint in Improvised Music and Movement

John R Pippen, University of Western Ontario. Moving New Music: Disrupting the Mind/Body Divide in Western Art Music

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Health and Healing

CORD: Independence Ballroom D

Toni Shapiro-Phim. A Sacred Melody and Innovative Choreography in Cambodia

Karen Schaffman. Kinesthetics of Crying and Soundtracks of Tears: Performing Grief in Works by Deborah Hay and Ralph Lemon

Carlos Odria. Improvising Transcendence for Health and Healing: Spontaneous Sounds and Bodies in a Dance Composition Class

Rodrigo Caballero. Sound, healing and the body: acoustemologies of health in the Pacific Northwest

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4:00-5:30

The Body in Flow: Sport as Dance

SEM: 8A Freedom Ballroom (Section E), Live Video-Streaming Room Chair: Jonathan M Dueck, Duke University

Jonathan M Dueck, Duke University. The Big Dance: Sound, Gender, and Flow in Collegiate Basketball

Timothy J Cooley, University of California, Santa Barbara. To Surf is to Dance: Hawaiian Mele and Hula and the History of Surfing

Judy Bauerlein, California State University, San Marcos. A Wave is A Body In Motion

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Gay and Queer Studies

SEM: 8E Freedom Ballroom (Section F) Chair: Gregory Barz, Vanderbilt University

William Cheng, Harvard University. Acoustemologies of the Closet: Online Gamespaces and Prosthetic Technologies of Queer Expression

Sarah E Hankins, Harvard University. “The Disguise Will Never Work All the Way”: Realness, Queerness and Music in a Gender Performance Community

Mark D Swift, Washington and Jefferson College. Dance Style, Masculine Identity, and the Gay Ethnographer in a Suburban Brazilian Scene

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Sounding Bodies, Moving Voices: Dance Performance in the Pacific Islands

SEM: 8F Freedom Ballroom (Section G) Chair: Adrienne Kaeppler, Smithsonian Institution

Jane Freeman Moulin, University of Hawai’i at Manoa. The Dancer’s Voice

Lisa Burke, Framingham State University. “A Wind that Penetrates the Skin”: Understanding Kiribati Music through Dance

Brian Diettrich, New Zealand School of Music. Stirred Spirits, Adorned Bodies: Sound and Gesture in Chuukese Community Performances

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Issues of Representation and Presentation in Public Culture Media Production

SEM: 8G Logans 2 Chair: Clifford R Murphy, Maryland State Arts Council

Clifford R Murphy, Maryland State Arts Council. Visiting With Neighbors: Fieldwork on Radio in Maryland

Nathan Salsburg, Lomax Archives/Association for Cultural Equity. Folk Revival 2.0: Presenting and Representing Vernacular Music in 2011

Maureen Loughran, Tulane University. Five Years After the Storm: Authority and Public Engagement in Radio Production

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INDIVIDUAL PAPERS OF INTEREST

Louise J Wrazen, York University. The Displaced Voice: Assertions of Selfhood and Belonging Amidst Change

9:00 am SEM: 5H Salon 3/4

Sharon F Kivenko, Harvard University. Listening for the Call and Knowing When to Come In: “Performance Sociability” in Mande Dance

9:30 am SEM: 5I Salon 5/6

Farzaneh Hemmasi, Hunter College. At a Distance: Voice, Dance, and Display among Female Iranian Vocalists in Exile

2:15 pm SEM: 7E Freedom Ballroom (Section F)

Chun-bin Chen, Tainan National University of the Arts. Hybridity in Taiwanese Aboriginal Cassette Culture

4:30 pm SEM: 8C Independence Ballroom (Section B)

Samuel Araujo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Amidst Walls, Wired Fences and Armored Cars: The Sound Heritage of Post-Industrial Society

5:00 pm SEM: 8K Parlor C

The Sun Ra Arkestra House

EVENTS

British Forum for Ethnomusicology High Tea Party

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm Liberty D

The Drexel University Mediterranean Ensemble Presents

A Mostly Balkan Party . . . Philly Style

7:30 pm – 9:30 pm The Stein Auditorium, Drexel University Campus 3215 Market St.

A.J. Racy and The Arabesque Music Ensemble in Concert

Presented by Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture

8:00 pm – 10:00 pm Trinity Center for Urban Life, 22nd and Spruce Streets

Dance Workshop: Sound and Vibrational Signals in Buto Dance

Led by Tanya Calamoneri

8:00 pm – 10:00 pm Independence Ballroom D, free to all registered CORD attendees

Dance Workshop: Singing Dance and Sensing Sound

Led by Amy Larimer

8:00 pm – 10:00 pm Salon 10, free to all registered CORD attendees

SEM Dance Section, CORD and CCDR Reception

10:00 pm – 11:00 pm Salon 5/6 (Free to all registered attendees)

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schoolly d album art

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SATURDAY, November 19, 2011

SATURDAY PANELS

8:30-10:30am

Listening to the Field: Sonic Presentations of Ethnographic Material

SEM: 9A Freedom Ballroom (Section E), Live Video-Streaming Room Chair: Ben Tausig, New York University

Ben Tausig, New York University. Playing Under Protest: Diffusion and Decay

Mack Hagood, Indiana University. Audio Production as SEO Services: Sounds and Stories in the Path of I-69

Senti Toy Threadgill, New York University. Voice in the Box: The Politics of Affect and Acoustemology in Nagaland

Deborah Wong, University of California, Riverside. Discussant

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Engaging Ethnomusicology and the Health Sciences

SEM: 9D Independence Ballroom (Section C) Chair: Frederick J Moehn, New York University

Theresa A Allison, University of California, San Francisco; Jewish Home, San Francisco. Music and Memory, Dementia and Song: Engaging the Health Sciences in Research on Music, Memory and Relationships

Heather B White, University of California, Berkeley. You are the Music, While the Music Lasts: The Neuroscience Behind Social Music Production and Identity

Jeffrey W Cupchik, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester. Teaching Medical Ethnomusicology: Engaging the Science(s) of Healing

Dane Harwood, independent scholar. Integrating Quantitative Methodology in Ethnomusicological Research: The Challenges to Moving towards Reproducible Results

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Music, Sound, Noise, Silence: Towards A Conceptual Lexicon

SEM: 9H Salon 3/4 Chair: Matt Sakakeeny, Tulane University

Matt Sakakeeny, Tulane University. Music

Thomas Porcello, Vassar College. Sound

David Novak, University of California, Santa Barbara. Noise

Ana María Ochoa, Columbia University. Silence

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Music in Oman: Interculturalism, Time, Space, and Politics in the Sultanate

SEM: 9I Salon 5/6 Chair: Anne K Rasmussen, College of William and Mary

Anne K Rasmussen, College of William and Mary. The Musical Design of National Space and Time in Oman

Nasser Al Taee, Oman Royal Opera House. Mozart in Muscat: Politics, Performance, and Patronage in Oman

Majid Al Harthy, Sultan Qaboos University. African Identities, Afro-Omani Music, and the Official Constructions of a Musical Past

Salwa El-Shawan Castelo-Branco, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal. Discussant

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The Commercial, the Popular, and the Crazed

CORD: Independence Ballroom D

Mary Fogarty. Musical Tastes in Popular Dance Practices

Mary Elizabeth Anderson. Oprah Feelin’: The Commercial Flash Mob’s Affective Game

Jennifer Fisher. When Good Adjectives Go Bad: “Lyrical Dance,” Romanticism, Brain Science, and the Competition Dance Machine

Ok Hee Jeong. The politics of Korean Wave

Asheley Smith. “Crank That”: The Work of Dance Crazes as Collective Memory and in Mechanical Reproduction

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Sensing Movement-Sound

CORD: Freedom Ballroom H

Candace Bordelon. Finding “the Feeling” Through Movement and Music: Oriental Dance, Tarab, and Umm Kulthum

W. Eric Aikens. Using Entropy as a Measure of the Dispersal of Temporal Energy in the Music/Dance Relation

Stephanie Schroedter. Music as Movement – “Kinesthetic listening” in the Creation and Reception of Dance

Wendy Rogers. Dancing in a Sound Space

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The Sonic, the Visual, and the Temporal

CORD: Salon 10

Freya Vass-Rhee. The sounds (and sights) of silence: William Forsythe’s compositions of quiet

Allen Fogelsanger. The Play of Visual and Sonic Actions: Watching Dance and Music

Wen-Chi Wu. Beyond Spontaneity Acquired Through the Lived “Habit-Body” vis-à-vis Performing Techniques

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10:45-12:15

Music and Bodies of Sound

SEM: 10F Freedom Ballroom (Section G) Chair: Daniel Reed, Indiana University

Kate Galloway, University of Toronto. Ecological Auditory Culture: The Relationship Between Ethnographic Soundscape Composition and How We Listen to the Environment

Devin M Burke, Case Western Reserve University. Sign Language Music Videos: Analyzing Embodied Musicking in a Culturally Hybridistic and Technologically Mediated Audio/Visual Artform

Leona N Lanzilotti, Eastman School of Music. Musical Theatre of the Deaf and Hearing: Understanding Musical Embodiment in a Mixed-Cast Production of Guys & Dolls

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Music and Movement

SEM: 10H Salon 3/4 Chair: Beth K Aracena, Eastern Mennonite University

Rebecca A Schwartz-Bishir, independent scholar. Music that Moves: Musique dansante and the Sensory Experience of the Dancing Body

Lynda Paul, Yale University. Liveness Reconsidered: Sound and Concealment in Cirque du Soleil

Beth K Aracena, Eastern Mennonite University. Towards a “Natural History” of Corpus Christi Processions in the New World

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INDIVIDUAL PAPERS OF INTEREST

Donna A Buchanan, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Choreographic Encounters of an Ethnomusicological Kind: Sound, Movement, Spirituality, and Community where the Balkans and Caucasus Converge

9:00 SEM: 9G Logans 2

Rachel Goc, University of Wisconsin, Madison. Global Practices of Motown Visual and Sonic Aesthetic

9:30 SEM: 9F Freedom Ballroom

Michael S O’Brien, Luther College. This is What Democracy Sounds Like: Mediation and Performativity in the Soundscapes of the 2011 Wisconsin Pro-Labor Protests

11:15 SEM: 10J Parlor A

Corinna S Campbell, Harvard University. Sounding the Body, Dancing the Drum: Integrated Analysis of an Afro-Surinamese Performance Genre

11:45 SEM: 10A Freedom Ballroom (Section E), Live Video Streaming Room

Rachel Mundy, Columbia University. O Bird of the Morning: Sound, Silence, and Information at the Species Boundary

11:45 SEM: 10K Parlor C

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EVENTS

SEM Seeger Lecture

Randy Martin: “Complex Harmonic Movements: Politicalities of Music and Dance”

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm Liberty Ballroom B, C and D

PhillyBloco Dance Party

7:30 pm – 10:30 pm Liberty Ballroom B, C, and D

(Ticket Required – $10.00 per attendee in advance or $15.00 per attendee at the door)

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SUNDAY, November 20, 2011

SUNDAY PANELS

8:30-10:30am

Musical Advocacy: Mediation, Creativity, and Social Engagement

SEM: 12A Freedom Ballroom (Section E), Live Video-Streaming Room Chair: Carol Muller, University of Pennsylvania

Marié Abe, Harvard University. Reimagining Oaxacan Heritage through Accordions and Airwaves in Central Valley, California

Michael Birenbaum-Quintero, Bowdoin College. Process, Network, and Knowledge: Theory and Praxis of a Grassroots Music Archive in the Afro-Colombian Hinterlands

Shalini R Ayyagari, American University. “Postcards from Paradise Weren’t Meant for Me”: Community Affiliation and Advocacy Work through South Asian American Hip Hop

Kay Shelemay, Harvard University. Discussant

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Material Culture and Musical Labor

SEM: 12C Independence Ballroom (Section B) Chair: Allen Roda, New York University

Allen Roda, New York University. Resounding Objects: Scripting Sounds and Making Music in Banaras Tabla Workshops

Darien Lamen, University of Pennsylvania. Crafting Sound: Sound Systems, Skilled Labor, and Artisanship in Belém do Pará, Brazil

John Paul Meyers, University of Pennsylvania. Stickers, Strings, and Sgt. Pepper Jackets: Resources for Re-Creating the Past in the Tribute Band Scene

Paul Greene, Pennsylvania State University. Discussant

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Screening and Round Table—From Fieldwork to “Film-work”: Representing Realities Through Ethnomusicological Film

SEM: 12F Freedom Ballroom (Section G) Chair: Elizabeth Clendinning, Florida State University

Discussants

Tim Storhoff, Florida State Univeristy

Todd Rosendahl, Florida State Univeristy

Sara Brown, Florida State Univeristy

Kayleen Justus, Florida State Univerisity

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New Identities in Jazz

SEM: 12H Salon 3/4 Chair: Ken Prouty, Michigan State University

Brett S Pyper, Klein Karoo National Arts Festival, South Africa. Listening Made Visible: Dance as Kinetic Listening Within South African Jazz Appreciation Societies

Yoko Suzuki, University of Pittsburgh. She’s a Japanese Jerry Lee Lewis!: Body, Mind, and Spectacle in Hiromi’s Jazz Piano Performance

Michael C Heller, Harvard University. Modeling Community in the Loft Jazz Era

Colter J Harper, University of Pittsburgh. Jazz, Race, and the Visual Narrative: Constructing Identity through the Photography of Charles “Teenie” Harris

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Modes of Analysis, Modes of Listening

SEM: 12G Logans 2 Chair: Matt J Rahaim, University of Minnesota

Shayna Silverstein, University of Chicago. Microrhythms and Metric Variation in Groove-Based Dance Music of the Arab East

Cornelia Fales, Indiana University. Provoking Modal Listening In Music

Mark Hijleh, Houghton College. World Music Theory: Issues and Possibilities

Michael Tenzer, University of British Columbia, and Matt J Rahaim, University of Minnesota. Discussants

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Round Table: Ethnicity, Culture and Body

CORD: Freedom Ballroom H

Dr. Suzana Martins, Dr. Daniela Amoroso, MA. Nadir Nóbrega, Sandra Santana

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INDIVIDUAL PAPERS OF INTEREST

Marc Gidal, Ramapo College of New Jersey. Audible Boundary-Work: “Crossing” and “Purifying” Afro-Gaucho Religions through Sound and Music

8:30 am SEM: 12I Salon 5/6

Michael B MacDonald. Decentralized Dance Party Manifesto: Boomboxes, Anarchy, and the Commons

10:00 am CORD: Independence Ballroom D

Emily J McManus, University of Minnesota. Listening to a Body and a Sound: Female Leading and Same-Sex Tango in the United States

11:15 am SEM: 13B Independence Ballroom (Section A)

Michael O’Toole, University of Chicago. How the City Sounds: Festivals and Urban Space in Contemporary Berlin

11:45 am SEM: 13I Salon 5/6

Liberty Bell

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