Tag Archive | War of the Worlds

Sounding Out! Podcast #23: War of the Worlds Revisited

White Flag Invert WOTW

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: War of the Worlds Revisited (Part 1)

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In case you missed our special “War of the Worlds” listening event, you can listen in again to the first part of our broadcast, featuring more than a dozen prominent radio historians, hosted by Brian Hanrahan (Cornell University), with critical reflections from Shawn VanCour (New York University), Kathleen Battles (Oakland University), and Alex Russo (Catholic University) [Part 1]; Brian Wall (SUNY Binghamton), Paul Heyer (Wilfrid Laurier University), and Tom McEnaney (Cornell University) [Part 2]; Kate Lacey (University at Sussex), Jason Loviglio (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Paul Heyer (Wilfrid Laurier University), Damien Keane (SUNY Buffallo), Josh Sheppard (The University of Wisconsin-Madison), and John Cheng (SUNY Binghamton) [Part 3]. Part one focuses on radio in the year 1938, part two focuses on Orson Welles, and part three focuses on the War of the Worlds broadcast itself, the media panics which ensued, and aftermath.

A producer of this broadcast, Aaron Trammell, is co-founder and multimedia editor of Sounding Out! He is also a Media Studies PhD candidate at Rutgers University.

tape reelREWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig:

Sound Bites: Vampire Media in Orson Welle’s Dracula— Debra Rae Cohen

Hello, Americans: Orson Welles, Latin America, and the Sounds of the “Good Neighbor”— Tom McEnaney

Sounding Out! Podcast #6:  Spaces of Listening/The Record Shop–Aaron Trammell

Sounding Out! Podcast #22: Remixing War of the Worlds

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD: Remixing War of the Worlds

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If you missed our #WOTW75 event, we will be re-broadcasting many of the key segments in the coming week. So, for a special Halloween treat, tune in to Sounding Out!‘s custom remix of Orson Welles’ The War of the Worlds. Here, Binghamton University professor, Monteith McCollum dazzles with a podcast that updates the original into an eerie piece of sound art.  Join Monteith as he and his Performative Processes class explore techniques of audio production nicked from the era of live radio theater. These analog techniques have been weaved into a remix of War of the Worlds guaranteed to send chills up your spine. So set the lights low, lock your door, and prepare for a podcast you won’t soon forget.

Monteith McCollum is an independent filmmaker, musician and educator who has taught at various schools in Chicago, Illinois and upstate New York such as Columbia College, Broome Community College and Ithaca College. He has been a visiting artist at colleges including Boston Museum School, Art Institute of Chicago and University of Iowa. You can learn more about his work at monteithmcollum.com.

tape reelREWIND! . . .If you liked this post, you may also dig:

Sound Bites: Vampire Media in Orson Welle’s Dracula— Debra Rae Cohen

Hello, Americans: Orson Welles, Latin America, and the Sounds of the “Good Neighbor”— Tom McEnaney

Sounding Out! Podcast #6: Spaces of Listening/The Record Shop–Aaron Trammell

#WOTW75 — It’s Time for “War of the Worlds!”

Click here to stream our broadcast in your web browser from WHRW in Binghamton, New York, beginning at 7pm EST!

Tweet along with us at #WOTW75

7:00-8:00 EST An all-new audio documentary hosted by Brian Hanrahan (Cornell) and featuring critical reflections from a dozen prominent radio historians, including Kate Lacey, Kathleen Battles, Jason Loviglio, Damien Keane, Alex Russo, Shawn VanCour and Tom McEnaney.

8:00-9:00 EST The re-broadcast of the original “War of the Worlds”!

9:00-10:00 EST  Hosted by SO!’s own Jennifer Stoever-Ackerman (Binghamton University), this hour includes live post-broadcast chats with Keane, McEnaney, and VanCour, and experimental soundscapes and drama produced by Binghamton University students and community members.

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Looking for the end of the world? Don’t panic, you’ve come to the right place. Our #WOTW75 project invites you to listen to and live-tweet Orson Welles’ classic “War of the Worlds” radio play tonight alongside hundred (thousands?) of others. This page has all you will need to participate.

When to Listen. Our project starts at  7 pm Eastern Standard Time on Wednesday, Oct. 30. Our goal is to keep in sync across listening sites everywhere.

How to Listen. Click here to stream our broadcast in your web browser from WHRW in Binghamton, New York. If this feed won’t work or goes down, see Alternative Listening Options below.

How to Respond. Use Twitter, Instagram and post on our Facebook group page using the hashtag #WOTW75. Be sure to follow @WOTW75 on Twitter and reply to one another). Posting a comment on this page is another option. Want to follow the conversation as a whole? Try our hashtag in tagboardGrover's Mill

Alternative Listening Options.  There are several other listening options available. You can stream the play from wellesnet, youtube or archive.org. These should be suitable to play on an ipod, phone or laptop. Please keep these links handy just in case something goes wrong with the WHRW feed (although we don’t anticipate this).

Public Radio Options. Want a real radio experience? KPCC Southern California Public Radio has generously given a feed out for free to a variety of public broadcasters, so check your local NPR, BBC or college station. KPCC will have its own broadcast on pacific time. They are sharing our hashtag, too. Here is a link with more information.

ticeHow to Help. All we need are your ears and keyboards, but if you want to build the project, add your friends to our FB group and post items from that feed to your wall.

How to Document. Doing something creative while listening? Installing WOTW on a streetcorner, in a bar, an observatory? Roaming rural New Jersey with a flashlight? We need images and artwork. Snap a few for us and send them our way. Your responses will archived both digitally and in print.

There’s more. Here is a link to the most recent entry in our From Mercury to Mars web series about Welles and radio, for which #WOTW75 is the centerpiece. Here is a link to Howard Koch’s WOTW script, in case you’d like to read along. Here is a recent radio play contest, and here is a recent episode of the podcast Aca-media on WOTW.white flag Check out PBS American Experience, which aired a major documentary on Tuesday night. Also, here is a new version of the story by Campfire Radio. Visiting New Jersey? There are live events out there in the moonlight, check out Raconteur Radio. Many more events and news items for the anniversary are up on  wellesnet.

Thanks for joining in on the fun. We’re eager to read your tweets and posts, and proud to annihilate the world before your very ears.

Questions, ideas? wotw75@soundingoutblog.com

Happy

From Mercury to Mars: A Hard Act to Follow: War of the Worlds and the Challenges of Literary Adaptation from Antenna

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This week our From Mercury to Mars: Orson Welles on Radio after 75 Years series begins ramping up for our big event, a listening party / social media experiment, in which we’re asking all of our fans and readers to listen to Orson Welles’ “War of the Worlds” radio play at the same time and respond to it on social media with the hashtag #WOTW75, beginning at 8:00 pm Eastern. On that date SO! Editor-in-Chief Jennifer Stoever-Ackerman,  SO! Multimedia Editor Aaron Trammellproducer Nick Rubenstein, Binghamton Cinema Professor Monteith McCollum and his “Performative Processes” class,  and BU’s Radio Drama Division will offer a broadcast from 90.5 FM WHRW radio in Binghamton, NY (and online) both before and after the play.

Remember to tune in to this blog on that date, and we’ll have lots of links and resources ready to help you participate. Organize your listening party now! Follow our project on Facebook and Twitter, too.

But first! Check out the most recent entry to the M2M series by contributor and media historian Shawn VanCour 

Post-apocalyptic“What is left to tell after the end of the world, and who is there to tell it? In his Mercury Theater signoff on October 30, 1938, producer and star Orson Welles boasted that the evening’s “War of the Worlds” broadcast had “annihilated the world before your very ears and utterly destroyed the C.B.S.” While these scenes of otherworldly invasion from the program’s opening 40-minute act have been a source of much discussion, its 20-minute closing act is seldom addressed and stands in stark contrast to the fast action and stylistic innovation of Act I …”

[Reblogged from Antenna]

Click here to read VanCour’s exceptional essay on the second act of the “War of the Worlds,” and what made it – from a stylistic point of view – perhaps more controversial than the first.

This is the sixth entry in our ongoing series on Welles and radio. Want to catch up with the series? See below.

  • Here is “Hello Americans,” Tom McEnaney‘s post on Welles and Latin America
  • Here is Eleanor Patterson‘s post on editions of WOTW as “Residual Radio”
  • Here is “Sound Bites,” Debra Rae Cohen‘s post on Welles’s “Dracula”
  • Here is Cynthia B. Meyers on the pleasures and challenges of teaching WOTW in the classroom
  • And … Here is Kathleen Battles on parodies of Welles by Fred Allen.

See you on the 30th! — nv

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