Tag Archive | Michael Bull

Functional Sound (Studies): The First European Sound Studies Association Meeting

On October 4-6, 2013 ESSA – The European Sound Studies Association – will have its first conference in Berlin. This initiative is just the latest sign that an institutionalization is taking place within the inter-disciplinary field of sound studies. Erik Granly Jensen, who is one of the founding members and vice-chair of ESSA, tells the story here:

During the past decade, the field of sound studies – or auditory culture if you will –has been growing immensely. International conferences and seminars, numerous dissertations, monographs and research articles have shaped a vibrant, interdisciplinary area of study that of course has a much longer history within the more traditional disciplines of the humanities and social sciences, but which during the past 10-15 years has morphed into a discipline of its own. Just last year, two extensive collections of theoretical texts appeared with major publishing houses, The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies (ed. Trevor Pinch & Karin Bijsterveld) on Oxford University Press and The Sound Studies Reader (ed. Jonathan Sterne) on Routledge. A second edition of the classic Auditory Culture Reader (ed. Michael Bull) is in the making and supposedly another Routledge anthology is being planned as well. Furthermore, in 2010 three European journals on sound cultures appeared within just a few months: the Holland-based Journal of Sonic Studies, the Ireland-based journal Interference and the Denmark-based SoundEffects; all three of them international online journals devoted to the analysis of sound cultures with an explicit ambition to integrate sound into academic analysis. To give an illustration of the interest that these journals are already enjoying is the fact that SoundEffects in 2012 alone had 15,000 individual article downloads.

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With all these activities taking place, supplemented by the high number of research networks and transnational research projects throughout Europe, for instance “Sound in Media Culture” sponsored by the German Research Foundation or “The Nordic Research Network for Sound Studies” sponsored by the Nordic Research Foundation, Nordforsk, it seemed to be a question of time before the area of sound studies would take yet another disciplinary step and bring all the efforts together in an association. For even if the field of sound studies is alive and well, the advantage of creating a lasting academic platform where researchers, practitioners and artists can meet annually to exchange ideas and build new networks should not be underestimated. The existence of an association and an explicit reference to a global community for research and artistic practice into sound could be the decisive argument for both the introduction of university programs and job positions within sound studies. ESSA, The European Sound Studies Association that was founded last year could become such a forum.

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As is so often the case, the idea for a sound studies association arose at an occasion that was scheduled for other purposes. In January of 2012, twelve members of the Nordic Research Network for Sound Studies were gathered in Copenhagen to plan the activities of the Nordic research network, www.sdu.dk/norsound. During discussions of a possible doctoral school that would include not just doctoral students from the Nordic countries, but be a traveling European doctoral school, the idea for both a European summer school and for a forum that could facilitate sound studies throughout the European continent was put on the table. Everybody present (including Anahid Kassabian, Michael Bull, Heikki Uimonen, and Marcel Cobussen to mention a few) agreed that this was both a great and a timely idea and the association ESSA, European Sound Studies Association, was born.

ESSA is a groundbreaking organization, bringing together the widest range of approaches to the study of sound. It’s exciting to be involved in its earliest stages and to participate in shaping this new community. I’m very much looking forward to its growth over the next few years and to ESSA becoming a productive environment for scholars working with many aspects of sound. –Anahid Kassabian, University of Liverpool

During the past year, an ESSA website was launched and discussions of a possible legal statute of the association have been circulating in the group parallel with the planning of the first ESSA conference. The reason for the working of the legal statute is, that ESSA in the future will be run by membership donations and through a democratically elected board of members.

In particular musicologist Morten Michelsen from the University of Copenhagen and Holger Schulze, professor of historical anthropology of Sound at the Academy of Arts in Berlin (two other members of the founding group) have been the driving forces of ESSA in this initial phase. At this point where everything is still waiting to happen, it is of course hard to predict what ESSA will be and what kind of an association it can be in the future. However, the ambition is to provide “a forum where those involved in the study of sound can meet and exchange ideas.” ESSA will also encourage “the development of research and systematic study in topics and in areas where such study in not well developed” as is stated on the website. In addition to these overall ambitions, the initial idea of a European doctoral summer school for sound studies still has a high priority as a future goal for ESSA.

With the founding of the European Sound Studies Association – the study of sound in all it’s inter-disciplinary richness and diversity now has an independent institutional voice for the first time. The range of sonic scholars that is converging on Berlin for ESSA’s first annual conference in October is evidence of both the need and the success of ESSA. The presence of ESSA will provide a platform, not just for European scholars, but for all those working on sound globally. –Michael Bull, University of Sussex

The theme for the upcoming conference in Berlin is “Functional Sound.” The conference will focus on existing as well as emergent and cutting-edge approaches to functional sound design, sonification, auditory culture, everyday soundscapes, artistic concepts and popular culture. In particular, the conference encourages presentations that include both theoretical and practical aspects and presentations that address everyday contexts within which sound—in its relation to media, technology, and the arts—is constitutive for new ways of thinking, listening, and becoming. The conference is a joint venture with the international research network “Sound in Media Culture” (led by Holger Schulze). During the three conference days, paper presentations in six parallel streams will cover topics such as “Soundscape of the Urban Future,” “Sound Design Practices,” “Sonic Artistic Practices and Research,” and “Cultural Politics & Sonic Experience.” [Editor: Click here for the full program, which includes several Sounding Out! editors and writers:  Jennifer Stoever-Ackerman, Neil Verma, reina alejandra prado saldivar, Mack Hagood, and Regina Arnold. –JSA]

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The confirmed keynote speakers are all leading scholars in the field and include Douglas Kahn, who is professor of Media and Innovation at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. Professor Kahn has been a driving force for the development of sound studies, primarily due to his influential 2001 book Noise, Water, Meat: A History of Sound in the Arts.  Jason Stanyek, professor at the Faculty of Music at Oxford University, is also a keynote speaker. Professor Stanyek is a musicologist, who specializes in Brazilian hip-hop and Pan-African Jazz. Also he is the co-editor of The Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies. The final keynote speaker is Thomas Macho, professor in cultural history at the Humboldt University in Berlin. Professor Macho has published on numerous subjects but of special interest for the sound studies field is his work concerned with the human voice and most recently his book on synchronization, Kulturtechniken der Synchronisation from 2011.

For those who cannot make it to Berlin this year, the place and dates for the 2014 ESSA conference have already been decided. It will take place in Denmark on June 27-29 2014 at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense. To be updated about ESSA and future events, please visit the website, http://www.soundstudies.eu, and sign up.

Featured Image Courtesy of Mediateletipos.  In 2008,  artist Akio Suzuki presented a sound installation around Berlin’s water tower focused on listening to everyday situations, directing listener’s attention through audial symbols painted on the ground.

Erik Granly Jensen is associate professor at the Department for the Study of Culture at the University of Southern Denmark. He is the research leader of The Nordic Research Network for Sound Studies, sponsored by Nordforsk 2011-2014. He is also the co-editor of the online journal SoundEffects and a founding member of ESSA, The European Sound Studies Association. His most recent research areas include historical sound archives and radio art. Contact: erikgranly@sdu.dk

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“Once the word ‘sound’ was in the title, it opened up a kind of door”: A Conversation with Eric Weisbard –-Liana Silva

Listening to the A. D. White House: Cornell’s Society for the Humanities’ Year in Review–Timothy Murray

Sound at ASA 2012–Jennifer Stoever-Ackerman

 

Sound at AMS/SEM/SMT 2012

This week brings us #musicon12, the megaconference of the American Musicological Society (AMS), the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM), and the Society for Music Theory (SMT). This will be the third joint conference of these societies, after Oakland in 1990 and Toronto in 2000. These roughly decennial gatherings of the three principal scholarly societies of music scholarship provide increased opportunities for cross-disciplinary conversations and amazing live performances. A fact augmented even more by the selection of New Orleans, a city known for its music, for this year’s meeting.

The conference takes place in the Sheraton and Astor Crowne Plaza hotels from this Wednesday, October 31st through Sunday, November 4th. It will be preceded by two events. The first, occurring Monday, October 29th and Tuesday, October 30th, at Tulane University’s Rogers Memorial Chapel, is Ecomusicologies2012, a pre-conference organized by the AMS Ecocriticism Study Group and the SEM Ecomusicology Special Interest Group. The second, all day Wednesday, October 31st, is the Preconference Symposium on Crisis and Creativity, held at the Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life at Tulane University.

The disciplines of musicology, ethnomusicology, and music theory have focused on sound for centuries. They are the disciplines that Michael Bull argues Sound Studies “goes beyond” in the upcoming anthology Sound Studies. While such a description could lead to the categorization of these disciplines as theoretically or methodologically antiquated, #musicon12 is too large and significant for Sound Studies to ignore, with over 600 individual presentations that all deal with sound or music somehow. The first eleven papers, in chronological order, should give some idea of the overall scope:

Dorcinda Knauth (State University of New York, Dutchess), “Composing the Future by Listening to the Musical Past: Islamic Exegesis in Javanese Folksongs”
Ruth Davis (University of Cambridge), “The Pilgrimage to ‘El-Ghriba’ and the Musical Aesthetics of a Muslim-Jewish Past”
Abigail Wood (University of Haifa, Israel), “Sound, Aesthetics, and the Narration of Religious Space in Jerusalem’s Old City”
Jonathan Dueck (Duke University), “Musical Lives and Aesthetics in the Worship Wars”
Kim Carter Muñoz (University of Washington), “‘¡Todos somos huastecos! ‘We are all Huastecan!’: Performance of the Democratization of Son Huasteco at El Festival de la huasteca (The Festival of the Huasteca)”
Raquel Paraíso (University of Wisconsin-Madison), “Festival Son Raíz: Building Community and Signifying Identity and Culture Ownership across Mexican Regions”
Ian Middleton (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), “Identity, Peace, and Learning at Rural Music Festivals in Colombia’s Caribbean Coast”
Brenda M. Romero (University of Colorado, Boulder), “‘El Carnaval de Río Sucio No Es Festival’ / ‘The Carnival of Río Sucio is Not a Festival’”
Michael O’Toole (University of Chicago), “Rehearsing Publics in a ‘Turkish Art Music’ Ensemble in Berlin”
Suzanne Wint (University of Chicago), “Rehearsing the Social: Becoming a Performer in Kampala’s Classical Music Scene”
Gregory Weinstein (University of Chicago), “Recording Rehearsing: The Hidden ‘Process of the Classical Studio Session’”

But for the sake of argument, if Sound Studies is something more than simply the application of long-standing disciplinary approaches to sonic works and events, if, as Jonathan Sterne proposed this year in his introduction to The Sound Studies Reader, “the difference between sound studies and… other fields is that they don’t require engagement with alternative epistemologies, methods, or approaches” (4), then we are inclined to pay attention to that work that reaches beyond the limits of conventional music scholarship, namely the sort which strives for some sort of critical self-reflection or interdisciplinary ambition.

Lost Bayou Ramblers. Borrowed from phillipleroyer on Flickr.

This is not an easy task given the vast number of papers and performances at such a large conference and the scarcity of information found in brief titles and abstracts. We can assume that every presentation challenges these conventions to some extent, but for the sake of this preview, here are a few items that venture beyond the traditional limits of music scholarship. You can find the full #musicon12 program here.

Featured Image: Mardi Gras 2005, By Robert Garcia, The City Project

Bill Bahng Boyer is an adjunct professor of music, writing and rhetoric at Dartmouth College. He is also a doctoral candidate in music at New York University, completing a dissertation on public listening in the New York City subway system.

Jump to MONDAY, October 29
Jump to TUESDAY, October 30
Jump to WEDNESDAY, October 31
Jump to THURSDAY, November 1
Jump to FRIDAY, November 2
Jump to SATURDAY, November 3
Jump to SUNDAY, November 4

New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 2005, Borrowed From Robert Garcia, The City Project

MONDAY, October 29

Ecomusicologies2012

All events at Rogers Memorial Chapel, Tulane University

5-6pm Soundwalk

Tyler Kinnear (University of British Columbia), “Environmental Listening and the Tulane Soundscape” (meeting place outside the entrance of the Rogers Memorial Chapel, Tulane University)

7-9pm Paper Jam

Chair: Aaron S. Allen (University of North Carolina, Greensboro)

Joe Browning (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London) (virtual presentation), “Crane Calls and Shakuhachi Sounds: Interconnections, Disjunctures and New Directions in the Tsuru no Sugomori Pieces”

Travis Stimeling (Millikin University) (virtual presentation), “Music, Television Advertising, and the Green Positioning of the Global Energy Industry in the United States”

Olga Sánchez-Kisielewska (Northwestern University) (virtual presentation), “Theorizing the Musical Landscapes of John Luther Adams”

Andrew Mark (York University) (virtual presentation), “Consciousness, Solidarity, and Musicking: Ecoethnographic Justice”

Leah G. Weinberg (University of Michigan), “Orchestrating Nature: Music, Manipulation, and 1950s America in Disney’s True- Life Adventure Films”

Settimio Fiorenzo Palermo (Middlesex University), “Sounds Heard: the Environmental Ethics & Aesthetics of Hugh Davies’s Music”

Sabine Feisst (Arizona State University), “Negotiating Nature & Music Through Technology: Ecological Reflections in the Works of Maggi Payne & Laurie Spiegel”

The Canal Street Line. Borrowed from Hmeriomx on Flickr.

TUESDAY, October 30

Ecomusicologies2012 (cont.)

All events at Rogers Memorial Chapel, Tulane University

8:30-10:30am Panel: Beyond Metaphor

Mark Pedelty (University of Minnesota), Chair

Marc Perlman (Brown University), “Instrument Builders As Environmental Activists: A Tale of Two Tonewoods”

Kevin Dawe (University of Leeds), “Small is Beautiful: Guitar Making, Sustainability and Community Building in Britain and Africa”

Jeff Todd Titon (Brown University), “Why Thoreau?”

Jennifer C. Post (New Zealand School of Music, Victoria University, Wellington), “Beyond Birds: (Ethno)musicologists, Environmental Scientists & the Evolution of Soundscape Ecology”

11am-1pm Panel: 20th & 21st-century Composers

Denise Von Glahn (Florida State University), Chair

Eric Drott (University of Texas at Austin), “The Peasant’s Voice and the Tourist’s Gaze:  Listening to Landscape in Luc Ferrari’sPetite symphonie intuitive pour un paysage de printemps”

You Nakai (New York University), “An Electronic Ecology:  The Natures of David Tudor’s Electronic Music”

Jacob A. Cohen (The Graduate Center, CUNY), “Carl Ruggles, Walt Whitman, and the Gendered Place of Men and Mountains”

Joseph Finkel (Arizona State University), “Searching for a Sonic Ecology:  John Luther Adams’s Dark Waves”

2-3:30pm, Panel: Contemporary Issues

Sabine Feisst (Arizona State University), Chair

Melissa J. de Graaf (University of Miami), “‘The Music of Nature Makes Me Dream and Sleep’: Intersections of Nature, Gender, and Ultramodernism”

Alexandra Hui (Mississippi State University), “Agency and Aural Rights: Negotiating the Soundscape, 1948 to the Present”

Tyler Kinnear (University of British Columbia), “Emergent Soundscapes: Uses of Nature and Technology in Two Electroacoustic Compositions”

4-6pm, Panel: Ethnographic Approaches

William Bares (University of North Carolina, Asheville), Chair

Dan Bendrups (Queensland Conservatorium Resarch Centre, Griffith University), “Mapping Outdoor Music Festival Engagement with Ecological and Environmental Issues in Australia”

Robin Ryan (Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, Edith Cowan University), “Eucalyptus as Musical Resource: Some Ecological Considerations”

Michael Silvers (University of California, Los Angeles), “Birdsong, Popular Music, &Predicting Rain in Northeastern Brazil”

Charlotte D’Evelyn (University of Hawaii), “Sounds of the Grasslands: An Ecomusicological Crisis of Romanticism, Loss, & Inheritance in Inner Mongolia, China”

6:30-8pm, Panel: Canadian Perspectives

Ellen Waterman (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Chair

Kate Galloway (Memorial University of Newfoundland), “Sounding the Environmental Past and Present: Repurposing and Representing Soundscape in Contemporary Canadian Compositions”

Erin Scheffer (University of Toronto), “The Mis-imagined Native: Musically Constructing Nativeness in 1940s Canadian Radio and Film Docudramas”

Jeremy Strachan (University of Toronto), “Sounding Empire: Coloniality and Environment in Canadian Art Music”

8-9pm, Reception & Concert

James Harley (University of Guelph), computer, and Ellen Waterman (Memorial University of Newfoundland), amplified flutes, “Birding,” an eco-improvisational performance by ~spin~

Borrowed from mattbyrne on Flickr.

WEDNESDAY, October 31

SEM Pre-conference Symposium, Crisis and Creativity

All events at Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life, Tulane University

9:00-10:30am, Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans

Matt Sakakeeny (Tulane University), Chair

Nick Spitzer, Professor of Anthropology (Tulane University), Holly Hobbs, Director of the NOLA Hip-Hop Archive (Tulane University), Bennie Pete, leader of Hot 8 Brass Band

10:45-12:15pm New Realities: Haitian Performing Arts and the Built Environment

Joyce Jackson (Louisiana State University), Chair

Gage Averill, Dean of Arts (University of British Columbia)

Michael Largey, Professor of Ethnomusicology (Michigan State University)

Jean Montes, Director of Orchestral Studies (Loyola University New Orleans)

1:15-2:45pm, Environmental Crises in South Louisiana: Scientific, Sociological, and Ethnomusicological Perspectives

Mark DeWitt (University of Louisiana at Lafayette), Chair

Tommy Michot, Research Scientist (UL Lafayette), and member of Les Frères Michot

Robert Gramling, Professor of Sociology (UL Lafayette)

Mark DeWitt, Professor of Music (UL Lafayette)

3:00-5:00pm, Field Trip by Bus to Musician’s Village, New Orleans Area Habitat for Humanity (Upper Ninth Ward), House of Dance and Feathers (Lower Ninth Ward)

Milterngerger House. Borrowed from DavidPaulOhmer on Flickr.

THURSDAY, November 1

8:30-10:30am, The Beautiful, The Good, and The Story: Aesthetics and Narrative in Religious Music

Session 1-1 (SEM) A: Astor Ballroom 1

Jonathan Dueck (Duke University), Chair

Dorcinda Knauth (State University of New York, Dutchess), “Composing the Future by Listening to the Musical Past: Islamic Exegesis in Javanese Folksongs”

Ruth Davis (University of Cambridge), “The Pilgrimage to ‘El-Ghriba’ and the Musical Aesthetics of a Muslim-Jewish Past”

Abigail Wood (University of Haifa, Israel), “Sound, Aesthetics, and the Narration of Religious Space in Jerusalem’s Old City”

Jonathan Dueck (Duke University), “Musical Lives and Aesthetics in the Worship Wars”

12:30-1:30pm, SEM Sound Studies Special Interest Group Meeting

S: Oakley

3:30-5:00pm, On Bells, Bugs, and Disintegrating Tape: Listening for Metaphysics in Ambient Sound

Session 1-44 AMS/SEM S. Edgewood

Mitchell Morris (University of California, Los Angeles), Chair

Paul Chaikin (University of Southern California), “Clattering Bells as a Field of Experience and Cognition”

James Edwards (University of California, Los Angeles), “Nature and the Metaphysics of Voice in Edo Period Aesthetics”

Joanna Demers (University of Southern California), “The Ethics of Apocalypse”

4:00-5:30pm, Musically Meaningful Soundscapes

Session 1-52 SEM S: Maurepas

Tom Porcello (Vassar College), Chair

Alison Furlong (Ohio State University), “Sound, Space, and Social Practice in the Zionskirche”

Kate Galloway (Memorial University of Newfoundland), “Sounding and Composing the Harbour: Performing Landscape and Re-contextualizing the Soundscape of Place in the Harbour Symphony (St. John’s, Newfoundland)”

Jessamyn Doan (University of Pennsylvania), “‘Bringin’ Back the Roots’: Rearticulating a Creole Sound in Southern Louisiana”

5:30–6:30pm, SEM First-Time Attendees and New Members

Reception S: Sheraton Grand B

5:30–6:30pm, AMS Ecocriticism SG* and SEM Ecomusicology SIG Joint Business Meeting

S: Oak Alley

7:30–midnight, Zydeco Dance Lesson and Evening at Rock’n’Bowl

Organized by the SEM 2012 Local Arrangements Committee and the SEM Dance, Movement, and Gesture Section

Dance Lesson at Sheraton Grand E (no ticket required), 7:30–8:30 p.m.

Evening at Rock’n’Bowl. Bus Departs Sheraton: 8:45 p.m. Bus Departs Rock’n’Bowl for Sheraton: 12:00 midnight

8:00–11:00 AMS Music and Philosophy SG Session

A: Astor Ballroom III

8:00-11:00pm, Fantasy, Cinema, Sound, and Music

Session 1-58 AMS S: Oak Alley

Mark Brill (University of Texas at San Antonio)

James Deaville (Carleton University)

J. Drew Stephen (University of Texas at San Antonio)

Jamie Lynn Webster (Portland, Ore.)

8:00-11:00pm, Music and Nature: Relations, Awareness, Knowledge

Session 1-64 AMS S: Borgne
Sponsored by the AMS Ecocriticism SG

Aaron Allen (University of North Carolina, Greensboro), Chair

Kevin Dawe (University of Leeds), “RELATIONS—A Social and Environmental History of Small Guitar Workshops in England”

Sabine Feisst (Arizona State University), “AWARENESS—‘Hello, the Earth is Speaking’: Four Case Studies of Ecological Composition, Performance, and Listening”

David E. Cohen (Columbia University), “KNOWLEDGE—Nature, Culture, and the First Principle(s) of Music: Two Myths of Theoretical Revelation”

Borrowed from prayitno on Flickr.

FRIDAY, November 2

7:00–8:00am, SEM SIG for Voice Studies

S: Estherwood

7:00–8:30am, SMT Committee on the Status of Women

S: Roux Bistro Private

9:00-noon, The Ecomusicology Listening Room

Session 2-17 AMS/SEM S: Gallier
Co-Sponsored by the SEM Sound Studies Interest Group and the AMS Popular Music Study Group

Mark Pedelty (University of Minnesota), Chair

Robert Fallon (Carnegie Mellon University), Ellen Waterman (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Tyler Kinnear (University of British Columbia), Aaron Allen (University of North Carolina, Greensboro), Denise Von Glahn (Florida State University), Kate Galloway (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Naomi Perley (CUNY), William Bares (Harvard University), Rachel Mundy (Columbia University), Jeremy Woodruff (University of Pittsburgh), Justin D. Burton (Rider University), Michael Austin (University of Texas at Dallas), Michael B. Silvers (University of California, Los Angeles), Miki Kaneda (Museum of Modern Art), Zeynep Bulut (Berlin Institute for Cultural Inquiry)

10:30-noon, Beyond Hearing: Soundscapes and Ideoscape in Early Nineteenth-Century America

Session 2-25 AMS/SEM A: Iberville
Deane Root (University of Pittsburgh), Chair

Sarah Gerk (University of Michigan), “Love, Loyalty, and Fear: American Reception of Thomas Moore’s Irish Melodies”

Bonnie Gordon (University of Virginia), “Mr. Jefferson’s Ears”

12:00–2:00pm, AMS/SMT Music and Philosophy SG/IG

S: Sheraton Grand A

12:30–1:30pm, SEM Medical Ethnomusicology SIG

A: Astor Grand A

12:30–1:30pm, SEM Section on the Status of Women

S: Bayside C

2:00-5:00pm, Embodiment and Gesture

Session 2-38 AMS/SMT S: Oak Alley

Arnie Cox (Oberlin College), Chair

Margaret Britton (University of Texas at Austin), “Four Gestural Types in Chopin’s Mazurka in C-sharp Minor, Op. 50, no. 3”

Drew Massey (Binghamton University), “Thomas Adès’s Glossary”

Meghan Goodchild (CIRMMT / McGill University), “Towards a PerceptuallyBased Theory of Orchestral Gestures”

Zachary Wallmark, Marco Iacoboni (University of California, Los Angeles), “Embodied Listening and Musical Empathy: Perspectives from Mirror Neuron Research”

4:00-5:30pm, SEM Charles Seeger Lecture

Session 2-49 SEM S: Sheraton Grand C

Portia Maultsby (Indiana University), “‘Everybody Wanna Sing my Blues . . . Nobody Wanna Live My Blues’: Deconstructing Narratives of Race, Culture and Power in African American Music Scholarship”

Cheryl L. Keyes (University of California, Los Angeles), Introduction

6:00pm, Sound Studies Special Interest Group Soundwalk

Meet in front of the Sheraton Hotel on Canal Street

Matt Sakakeeny (Tulane University), organizer

8:00-11:00pm, Music and Video Games: History, Theory, Ethnography

Session 2-55 AMS S: Gallier

William Cheng (Harvard University), Moderator

Mark Katz (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), Respondent

Neil Lerner (Davidson College), “Musicological Contributions to Early Video Game Studies”

Roger Moseley (Cornell University), “Digital Analogies”

William Gibbons (Texas Christian University), “Framing Devices for Gaming Devices: Applying Film Music Theory to Video Games”

Elizabeth Medina-Gray (Yale University), “Modularity and Dynamic Play: Video Game Music and Its Avant-garde Antecedents”

Kiri Miller (Brown University), “Dance Central and the Listening Body”

Borrowed from squared2x on Flickr.

SATURDAY, November 3

7:00–8:30am, SMT Music and Disability IG

S: Salon 828

7:00–8:45am, AMS Committee on Women and Gender

S: Salon 825

8:30-10:30am, Emergent Forms of Music Tourism, I: Music Tourism in the Aftermath of Rupture in New Orleans, Berlin, Bali

Session 3-2 SEM S: Bayside B
Daniel Sharp (Tulane University), Chair

Elizabeth Macy (University of California, Los Angeles), “Music and Cultural Tourism in Post-Disaster Economies”

Luis-Manuel Garcia (Tulane University), “Consuming Atmospheres and Social Worlds: ‘Techno-Tourismus’ and Post-Tourist Tourism in Berlin’s Electronic Dance Music Scenes”

Daniel Sharp (Tulane University), “Dithyrambalina: A Shantytown Sound Installation in Post-Katrina New Orleans”

SherriLynn Colby-Bottel (University of Virginia), “Authenticity Seekers: Music Post-Tourists and the Shifting Sound-Scapes of New Orleans”

8:30-10:30am, Online Musical Communities

Session 3-7 AMS/SEM A: Astor Ballroom 1
Marc Gidal (Ramapo College of New Jersey), Chair

Tara Browner (University of California, Los Angeles), “Bach Culture: Performers, Scholars, and Bachfreunde in the Twenty-First Century”

Olga Panteleeva (University of California, Berkeley), “Für Kenner und Liebhaber 2.0: Modes of Expertise in Online File-Sharing Communities”

Tom Artiss (University of Cambridge), “Solitary Socialities: Music Surf-Sharing in Nain, Labrador”

Charles Hiroshi Garrett (University of Michigan), “Joking Matters: Music, Humor, and the Digital Revolution”

9:00-10:30am, Language and the Senses

Session 3-10 AMS/SMT S: Edgewood
Donald Boomgaarden (Loyola University New Orleans), Chair

Charles Dill (University of Wisconsin-Madison), “Le Cerf’s Epistemology of Music”

Amy M. Cimini (University of Pennsylvania), “René Descartes’ Unfinished Compendium of Music: Rethinking Music and the Politics of Sensation after the Thirty Years’ War

9:00-10:30am, Music and Gaming

Session 3-12 AMS A: Iberville
Kiri Miller (Brown University), Chair

Christopher Tonelli (Memorial University of Newfoundland), “The Chiptuning of the World”

Neil Lerner (Davidson College), “Investigating the Origins of Video Game Music Style, 1977–1983: The Early Cinema Hypothesis”

9:00-noon, Performing Music, Performing Disability

Session 3-19 AMS/SEM/SMT S: Bayside A
Joseph Straus (Graduate Center, CUNY), Chair

Michael Bakan (Florida State University), Michael Beckerman (New York University), Stefan Honisch (University of British Columbia), Blake Howe (Louisiana State University), Stephanie Jensen-Moulton (Brooklyn College, CUNY), Bruce Quaglia (University of Utah)

9:00-noon, Sound, Language, and Mysticism from Vienna to L.A.

Session 3-22 AMS S:Borgne
Brian Kane (Yale University), Chair

Clara Latham (New York University), “The Impact of Sound and Voice on the Invention of Psychoanalysis”

Sherry Lee (University of Toronto), “‘Still, o schweige’: Music, Language, OpernKrise (Schoenberg’s Die glückliche Hand )”

Nicholas Attfield (Edinburgh University), “A Medieval Model for the 1920s: Anton Bruckner as Mystic”

J. Daniel Jenkins (University of South Carolina), “I Care If You Listen: Schoenberg’s ‘School of Criticism’ and the Role of the Amateur”

10:30-noon, Twentieth-Century Music and Advertising

Session 3-28 AMS A: Iberville

Jason Hanley (Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum), Chair

Paul Christiansen (University of Southern Maine), “‘It’s Morning Again in America’: How the Tuesday Team Revolutionized the Use of Music in Political Ads”

Jonathan Waxman (New York University), “I Went to the New York Philharmonic and Came Home with a Cadillac: The Alliance Between Business and the Arts in the Early Twentieth Century

12:00–2:00pm, SMT Committee on the Status of Women Brown Bag Open Lunch

S: Salon 828

12:30–1:30pm SEM Gender and Sexualities Taskforce

S: Bayside C

1:45-3:45pm, Acoustics and Experiences of the Limit

Session 3-39 SEM S: Maurepas

Louise Meintjes (Duke University), Chair

Louise Meintjes (Duke University), “Pushing at the Edge of the Social”

Jairo Moreno (University of Pennsylvania), “Signatures of the Audible”

Ana Maria Ochoa (Columbia University), “South American Acoustics: Amerindian Perspectivism and Non-Linear Musical Histories”

Gary Tomlinson (Yale University), “Singing at the Limit of the Human”

1:45-3:45pm, Emergent Forms of Music Tourism, II: Multimedia, Spectacles and Memorials

Session 3-43 SEM S: Grand Chenier
Sponsored by the Popular Music Section (PMSSEM)

Lynda Paul (Yale University), Chair

Elizabeth Whittenburg Ozment (University of Georgia), “Elvis Presley and the Reanimation of Robert E. Lee”

Lynda Paul (Yale University), “Las Vegas and Virtual Tourism: Sonic Shaping of Simulated Worlds”

Michael Heller (Harvard University), “Deployments of Deadness at the Louis Armstrong House Museum”

Nicol Hammond (New York University), “‘The History Is in the Music’? Music, Museums, and the Politics of Presence in Post-Apartheid Cultural Tourism”

8:00-11:00pm, Music and Disability: Works in Progress Seminar

AMS/SMT S: Bayside A
Sponsored by the AMS Disability SG and SMT Disability IG

Michael Bakan (Florida State University), James Deaville (Carleton University), Stefan Honisch (University of British Columbia), Jeanette Jones (Boston University), Anabel Maler (University of Chicago), Julie Saiki (Stanford University), Joseph Straus (Graduate Center, CUNY)

9:00pm, KNOCKABOUT: wandering beats from across urban America.

Handsome Willy’s at 218 South Robertson St. No cover. 21+

5 DJs converge on Handsome Willy’s for KNOCKABOUT, a dance party featuring every genre you’ve ever loved and fly beats that you neva eva heard before.

DJ Yamin (NOLA): Hip-hop, funk, reggae, Afrobeat www.nolamix.com

DJ Super Squirrel (Boston): Dancehall, global mashup www.djsupersquirrel.com

The Attic Bat (L.A.): Hip-hop and dubstep www.derricomusic.com

LMGM (Chicago, Berlin): House and disco www.thelusisgarcia.com

Shilo Bourne (L.A.) UK bass

Roger Lewis. Borrowed from fantailmedia at Fiickr.

SUNDAY, November 4

8:30-10:30am, Music and YouTube: Sound, Media, and Sociality

Session 4-5 SEM A: Astor Grand A
Sponsored by the Popular Music Section (PMSSEM)

Monique M. Ingalls (University of Cambridge), Chair

Fabian Holt (Roskilde University, Denmark), “Social Media Video and the Festivalization of Electronic Dance Music in Europe”

Monique M. Ingalls (University of Cambridge), “Worship on the Web: Building Online Religious Community through Christian Devotional Music Videos”

Patricia G. Lange (California College of the Arts), “In Synch with Lip-Synching: A Riff on Teen Sociality”

Trevor S. Harvey (University of Iowa), “Dulcimerica: Mediating a Musical Community through Video Podcasts”

8:30-10:30am, Musical Propertization in the Digital Age:

Session 4-7 SEM A: Astor Ballroom 1
From “Piracy” to Ontological Politics
Andrew Eisenberg (University of Oxford), Chair

Andrew Eisenberg (University of Oxford), “M-Commerce and the (Re)making of the Music Industry in Kenya”

Aditi Deo (University of Oxford), “Folk Music in the Digital Realm: Public Commons or Cultural Property?”

Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier (University of Victoria), “Pirates of the Caribbean: Music Circulation in Late Socialist Cuba”

Henry Stobart (Royal Holloway, University of London), “Shifting Properties: Ownership, Informality, and the Digital Music Video in Bolivia”

9:00-noon, The City is a Medium

Session 4-16 AMS/SEM/SMT S: Edgewood
Alexander Rehding (Harvard University), Chair

Veit Erlmann (University of Texas at Austin), Respondent

Benjamin Tausig (New York University), “The City is Burning: Informal Musical Commerce at Urban Protest Movements”

Tiffany Ng (University of California, Berkeley), “An Instrument of Urban Planning: Bells and the Sonic Remediation of Community Space in the Southeastern United States”

John Melillo (University of Arizona), “Phatic Emphatic: Listening to New York City in Downtown Poetry and Punk”

Peter McMurray (Harvard University), “Heterophony of a Metropolis: Rites of Passage and Contestation Turkish Berlin”

10:45-12:15pm, Feminist Approaches to Music and Sound Technologies: History, Theory, and Practice

Session 4-29 SEM A: Astor Ballroom 1
Sponsored by the Section on the Status of Women (SSW)
Tara Rodgers (University of Maryland), Chair

Tara Rodgers (University of Maryland), “Feminist Approaches to Electronic Music and Sound Historiography”

Charity Marsh (University of Regina), “Reluctant Hip Hop Warriors”: Feminist Approaches to Hop Hop Community Projects”

10:45-12:15pm, Intersections of Ethnomusicology with Other Fields

Session 4-31 SEM S: Bayside B

Theresa Allison (University of California, San Francisco), Chair

Francesca R. Sborgi Lawson (Brigham Young University), “Has Ethnomusicology Met Its Calling? An Ethnomusicologist’s Response to Biomusicology”

Monique McGrath (University of Toronto), “What Does Ethnomusicology Have to Say to Music Therapy?”

Jeremy Day-O’Connell (Knox College), “‘Motherese’ and Universals of Musical Pitch

10:45-12:15pm, Sounds and Space in New Orleans

Session 4-35 SEM S: Maurepas
Marié Abe (Boston University), Chair

Danielle Adomaitis (Florida State University), “Sonic Fixtures and Drifting Buskers: Soundmarks of New Orleans and the Street Musicians Who Construct Them”

Zarah Ersoff (University of California, Los Angeles), “Treme’s Aural Verisimilitude”

Julie Raimondi (Tufts University), “Music, SEO Agency, and the Social Construction of Space in New Orleans

2:00–6:00pm, AMS Ecocriticism SG and SEM Ecomusicology SIG Outing:

Barataria Preserve Hike

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